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Brett Vito

DRC: Here's how UNT's scholarship offer letters compare to other schools

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2 minutes ago, Mean Green 93-98 said:

Nice, but . . . the grammar error is embarrassing.  It should read, "if the above criteria are met."

Splitting hairs here, but hey, it's the offseason!

Is it a grammar error?  

From Merriam Webster:

Quote

Is criteria singular or plural?: Usage Guide

The plural criteria has been used as a singular for over half a century.  let me now return to the third criteria  — R. M. Nixon  that really is the criteria  — Bert LanceMany of our examples, like the two foregoing, are taken from speech. But singular criteria is not uncommon in edited prose, and its use both in speech and writing seems to be increasing. Only time will tell whether it will reach the unquestioned acceptability of agenda.

So if they're treating the word itself in a singular manner (like all of these things equals 1 requirement), then it would be "is".  Even if there are multiple criteria within, and not one single criterion.

Like you would say, "the football team is very good", even though there are multiple players that make up the singular team.

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Sorry, Texan.  Even if this improper usage has been increasing, it's plain wrong.  And your analogy won't work.  "Team" is a collective plural; "criteria" is not...it is the plural of "criterion."

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3 minutes ago, Mean Green 93-98 said:

Sorry, Texan.  Even if this improper usage has been increasing, it's plain wrong.  And your analogy won't work.  "Team" is a collective plural; "criteria" is not...it is the plural of "criterion."

That's kinda the argument I suppose.   It is becoming grammatically acceptable to use the word "criteria" as a collective plural.

So, using Merriam-Webster's example of agenda VS individual agendum... would you say, "The meeting's agenda is excessive."? Or would you say "The meeting's agenda are excessive."?   Technically, "are" is correct.   But it sounds wrong, and you'd likely confuse people into thinking there is more than one collective agenda.

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4 hours ago, MeanGreenTexan said:

That's kinda the argument I suppose.   It is becoming grammatically acceptable to use the word "criteria" as a collective plural.

That's not really what Webster's is saying.  Your citation shows that people are using criteria alternately as a singular noun (not a collective plural), as in that butchery of the English language found in the provided Nixon quote.  And if that obvious slippage in grammar is provided as Webster's best evidence that it is becoming acceptable to use criteria as a singular noun, the evidence is pretty weak.  And note that they say it has yet to reach acceptability, such as with agenda--they only say its usage is increasing.

Anyways, I didn't intend to hijack the thread for a grammar discussion.  I do have high expectations of my alma mater.  But I'll probably bow out on this discussion unless my return is demanded.

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25 minutes ago, Mean Green 93-98 said:

That's not really what Webster's is saying.  Your citation shows that people are using criteria alternately as a singular noun (not a collective plural), as in that butchery of the English language found in the provided Nixon quote.  And if that obvious slippage in grammar is provided as Webster's best evidence that it is becoming acceptable to use criteria as a singular noun, the evidence is pretty weak.  And note that they say it has yet to reach acceptability, such as with agenda--they only say its usage is increasing.

Anyways, I didn't intend to hijack the thread for a grammar discussion.  I do have high expectations of my alma mater.  But I'll probably bow out on this discussion unless my return is demanded.

😂.  I won’t have demanding you’re return.

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Do the Universities follow these tweets up with an actual written letter offer?  You know, “the old fashion way”?  Surely they do.

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