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  1. Howdy. I haven't been around in a few. Is it too early to be that loveable opposing fan you all remember? Thoughts on the upcoming game are that it's worrying to me that UNT gets a warmup game and we open the season at UNT with a new coach and system.
  2. Former North Texas running back Tre Siggers looks as advertised early on in camp. He has experience and will be a great combo with the electric Ulysses Bentley. Siggers had a great game vs SMU in 2019 and a great relationship with assistant HC/RB coach Ra’Shaad Samples. Sample’s dad, Reginald Samples, is a legendary coach in Texas and coached Tre at Duncanville High School. SMU is really excited about its new transfers on offense like Siggers, tight end Grant Calcaterra and QB Tanner Mordecai. read more: https://247sports.com/LongFormArticle/College-football-fall-camp-report-Jaxson-Dart-meeting-the-hype-169004498/#169004498_7
  3. When you consider elite tailgating atmospheres, you probably think of LSU, Ole Miss, the rest of the SEC. SMU likely doesn't grace the list– that is, until you've been there. The Boulevard is undeniably one of the best tailgating scenes in all of college football. It's high-class, energetic, widespread, and exciting. Plots on the Boulevard main strip are in high-demand and are mostly filled with wealthy alumni (which there are plenty of) and organizations. The farther north you get, typically the younger the crowd, until you get to the student's area. While it's more raucous than the tamed side across the street, it's still very high-brow. After all, SMU is the SEC team of the American. read more: https://www.si.com/college/tcu/.amp/football/road-to-cfb-smu-football-game-day
  4. SMU Mustangs Preview 2022: Offense It’s a Rhett Lashlee-coached team. It’s going to throw the ball – he’s a former SMU offensive coordinator under Sonny Dykes – and it’s going to crank up the production. The offense is loaded with experienced parts, good skill guys, and the line to make it all work from the No. 1 AAC attack last year. It led the league with 466 yards and 38 points per game, but it couldn’t rise up and come through down the stretch of a rough second half of the season. Lashlee and offensive coordinator Casey Woods have their veteran quarterback to make it all go. Former Oklahoma transfer Tanner Mordecai threw for over 3,600 yards and 39 touchdowns with 12 picks in an All-AAC season, and Preston Stone is a rising talent who’ll get every shot at the gig. The receivers are there to make it all rock, even with Danny Gray, Reggie Roberson, and TE Grant Calcaterra – three of the team’s top four targets – done. Leading receiver Rashee Rice – 64 catches with nine scores – is back – he’s the No. 1 guy – and the corps landed a few great parts with All-Conference USA target Jake Bailey from Rice, Beau Corrales from North Carolina, and Kelvontay Dixon from Texas. The running game should be like it was last year. It might not blast away for a gazillion yards per game, but as long as it’s averaging around 4.6 yards per carry again, it’ll be doing its job. Longtime all-around factor Ulysses Bentley is off to Ole Miss, but former North Texas transfer Tre Siggers is back after averaging five yards per pop with nine scores, and with a team-high 727 yards. TJ McDaniel is back after suffering an injury, and ready to roll is Alabama transfer Camar Wheaton. The talent is there from Wheaton and the rest of the backs to do the job. The SMU line will play around with the veteran parts – four starters are expected back from the end of last year – but Alan Ali is off to TCU and the depth will have to come from the transfer portal. Overall, the group that was the best in the AAC in pass protection should be fine once the staff comes up with the right starting five. Read more: https://collegefootballnews.com/2022/06/smu-mustangs-preview-2022-season-prediction-breakdown-key-games-players
  5. On a warm September night at Apogee Stadium, an offense led by then-junior quarterback Mason Fine put up 46 points for North Texas compared to Southern Methodist University’s 26. The aforementioned game was in 2018 and it is the last time North Texas had a significant triumph versus SMU on or off the field. Starting with its on-field performance, football has not found a way to make the annual Safeway Bowl close in the last two years, losing 49-27 in 2019 and 65-35 in 2020 — the latter of which was on the Mean Green’s home turf. Giving up a combined 114 points in the last two contests, North Texas’ defense has failed in stopping the likes of sophomore running back Ulysses Bentley IV who posted 19 carries for 227 yards and three touchdowns in 2020. It was the same story in 2019 when former SMU running back Xavier Jones tallied 16 carries for 127 yards and three touchdowns. To make matters worse, however, the damage is not just being done on the ground. The Mean Green were likely ecstatic to see former SMU quarterback Shane Buechele enter the NFL draft this year. In two career games against North Texas, Buechele threw for a combined 636 yards and seven touchdowns while dismantling the Mean Green defense. The lone standout performer for North Texas in either game was former running back Tre Siggers who in 2019 rushed for 164 yards and a touchdown versus SMU. This offseason, Siggers joined the Mustangs via the transfer portal. Read more: https://www.ntdaily.com/column-smu-is-beating-the-football-team-on-and-off-the-field/
  6. For simplicity let's look at it like this: UT and OU are going to the SEC period end of story. A&M may not like it but they are one vote. The remaining Big 12 leftovers are going to try their very best to land in a P5 conference. They are all in a disasterous situation but landing in a P5 at least gives them some semblance of hope. Kansas has a great basketball program but their football sucks. Could they be in the Big 10 for hoops sure - they would fit in fine but not in a million years for football. Texas Tech is talking PAC12 but does the PAC12 want their sub par academics? Do Tech fans want to travel out west? Baylor is talking ACC, and the ACC may like an entre into Texas but do Clemson and those types of programs want to travel into Waco? TCU and Baylor may want to be in the PAC 12 with Tech but the PAC 12 in the past has shunned religious programs. Would they make an exception? Iowa State and K-State seem to be on an island as Iowa does not want ISU in the B10. KState is interesting but not sure the B10 is dying to add them. Big 12 could try to get on the offense and add some programs asap to keep alive. Say Houston, UCF, USF Memphis, Cincy, SMU -- all of their top targets would be in the AAC. This is how things look to me now but there are rumblings that the SEC may try to add more like Clemson and FSU... if that happens wow this whole thing could blow up and we would just have one major conference. I tend to doubt that the SEC will go there yet because I think they teeter on monopolistic practices and it would involve a lot of political wrangling but at this point who knows. As is typical for UNT, we have to wait and see what happens with SMU. If SMU were able to convince the Big 12 to take them (don't kid yourself they have money and political power) and the Big 12 was able to survive it could mean that the AAC adds UNT. The problem is what is the AAC after being robbed by the Big 12? Another C-USA?
  7. SMU Speaking of checkered histories, SMU could face a somewhat more complicated reconciliation with its former SWC mates, as it was the chain of events that started with the Mustangs’ football scandal that ultimately led to the demise of the league. But again, with the NCAA’s amateurism model all but gone, history might be less of a consideration. read more: https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/ncaaf/big12/2021/07/22/big-12-add-schools-texas-oklahoma-sec-houston-ucf/8060264002/
  8. If Texas and Oklahoma officially make plans to leave, the strongest move the Big 12 could make is aggressively going after the top layer of the Group of Five, with a special focus on tying together a strong geographic league. Houston should be a first call, like it should have been last time. SMU should come. BYU, Memphis, UCF, Cincinnati, Appalachian State, Louisiana, Boise State should all be considered. Pick four of the schools, whichever ones make sense competitively, geographically and culturally. All of the schools I mentioned have perennially been in the top 25 discussion, both in football and basketball. While nothing will make up for the vacuum at the top of the league, it immediately would make the Big 12 a deep league filled with great programs. Let’s say for argument’s sake that the new league takes SMU, Houston, UCF and Memphis. The league would have a handful of conference championships and New Year’s Six bowl wins to its name, along with a solid geographic footprint and some fast-growing brands. Mix that with what Baylor, Iowa State, TCU and several others have done over the past few years and you have a very exciting football league. Read more: https://www.texasfootball.com/article/2021/07/23/why-the-big-12-should-bet-big-on-expansion?ref=article_preview_img
  9. SMU is 17-6 over the last two years, but if coach Sonny Dykes’ team wants to take the next step and contend for the conference title, there’s one glaring question mark to address this offseason. The Mustangs aren’t lacking for skill talent at running back or receiver, but uncertainty remains under center after the departure of Shane Buechele. Oklahoma transfer Tanner Mordecai and freshman Preston Stone are set to compete for the job and are crucial to the overall success of SMU’s 2021 season. The Mustangs gave up 30.9 points a contest last year, but seven returning starters under new play-caller Jim Leavitt should be enough to generate improvement on defense. read more: https://athlonsports.com/college-football/smu-football-mustangs-prediction-preview-2021
  10. I haven't been plugged into much news about this upcoming football season. Can someone point me to an existing thread or explain where UNT stands right now in terms of its schedule? I know A&M has cancelled all non-conference games this season but assuming C-USA doesn't shut down this season are we still expecting to play our non-conference opponents as it stands today? SMU, Houston, HBU? If we are still planning on playing everyone on schedule besides A&M, this season doesn't seem completely lost as I had once thought. As long as CUSA doesn't cancel, I feel pretty good about our success in the upcoming season.
  11. Watching the rivalry week games on TV this week and seeing the pitiful attendance as our game got me thinking of solutions. We heavily rely on student attendance for our games and most students go home for the holidays. If we are committed to playing every Thanksgiving weekend would it be beneficial for attendance both in Dentin and Dallas if we played SMU the Friday or Saturday after Thanksgiving? Hopefully someday we will be dominating our conference so these late season conference games will always be meaningful. However I believe regardless of our records more SMU and UNT fans would show up for a rivalry game regardless of our records.
  12. Usually would just use my THSCA tickets but I don't want to sell my soul and wear neutral (or forbid SMU colors) when we mow down those ponies. Not picky on location but would like to be in the visitors section!
  13. 2. North Texas (Sept. 7): SMU holds a massive 31-6-1 lead in this all-time series, but UNT has had two very convincing wins over the Mustangs since the series resumed five years ago -- a 37-point win in 2014 and a 23-point victory last fall in Denton. And last year's 46-23 win by North Texas wasn't even as close as the final score indicated -- the Mean Green actually led 36-0 after three quarters and SMU scored 23 fourth-quarter points to make the final score a little more respectable. 3. Will SMU's transfer portal reliance pay off? According to the 247Sports transfer portal database, SMU has brought in 16 transfers this offseason, most in the AAC. Houston (12) was the only other conference school to have double-digit transfers. Seventy-five percent of AAC schools brought in six or fewer transfers this offseason. While this is a great way to quickly improve the talent on SMU's roster, it's also a bit of a crapshoot when it comes to chemistry. Will new pieces fit well with old ones? Will players who were recruited out of high school feel slighted? read more: https://sportsday.dallasnews.com/college-sports/collegesports/2019/08/19/smu-mustangs-season-preview-breakout-candidates-key-questions-projected-results
  14. Patterson talking about North Texas during today's TCU presser IMG_1435.MOV
  15. SMU’s season opener could not have gone worse. The Mustangs were outgained, outplayed and outcoached in Saturday night’s 46-23 loss to North Texas at Apogee Stadium in Denton. “Everything that could go wrong went wrong,” SMU head coach Sonny Dykes said. SMU’s offense looked out of sync for the better part of the night. It started on the first drive, when the Mustangs went three and out after two penalties and a sack. Five of the Mustangs’ six first-half possessions ended in punts. On four of those drives, SMU went three and out. By the end of the first half, the Mustangs had just 24 total yards in the first half and only 46 by the end of the third quarter. “We never could get anything going,” Dykes said. “We couldn’t get on track. It just seemed like we were sluggish.” Ben Hicks’ struggles echoed those of the Mustangs’. He was under pressure all night long and had trouble throwing accurate passes to his receivers. He only completed three passes for 27 yards in the first half and threw an interception that was returned for a touchdown by North Texas’ Kemon Brooks to put the Mean Green up 14-0. Hicks rebounded in the fourth quarter, completing six of nine passes for 197 yards and two scores, but it was too little, too late. read more: http://www.smudailycampus.com/sports/everything-that-could-go-wrong-went-wrong
  16. We had the ball 3 times as long as the ponies. We more than doubled their yards offensively. And held them to 4 yards rushing.
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