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$60M Allen high school stadium closed due to structural flaws


Harry
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A North Texas high school's $60 million stadium that has been shut down since February amid structural flaws will remain closed through the fall football season.

The Allen Independent School District on Tuesday announced consulting engineers found "significant" structural problems at Eagle Stadium.

The decision, first reported by The Dallas Morning News, says Allen High School home games will be played in neighboring Plano.

Officials with the designer, PBK Architects Inc., and Pogue Construction on Monday said they're committed to correcting the problems.

read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/05/20/60m-texas-high-school-football-field-closed-due-to-structural-flaws/

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this topic is going nowhere. see you in another thread.

The only thing district officials would be on the line for would be choosing the architects who designed the stadium and general contractor who built it. If they didn't do their homework and didn't pick the best companies for the job at the price they were quoted, then I guess you could hold them accountable for that.

Based on the recent articles I have seen, there are design and construction flaws that lead to the closing of the stadium.

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I didn't read the full article, but if there is anyone with the district to be held accountable, it's whoever is responsible, in house, for over-site of construction projects. When they put in the rebar for concourse/roof area, there should have been someone from the school district out there with his tape, measuring the distance of the rebar. Obviously from one TV story, a few inches make a big difference.

I'm a little disappointed that we didn't make them an attractive offer for the use of Apogee.

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I didn't read the full article, but if there is anyone with the district to be held accountable, it's whoever is responsible, in house, for over-site of construction projects. When they put in the rebar for concourse/roof area, there should have been someone from the school district out there with his tape, measuring the distance of the rebar. Obviously from one TV story, a few inches make a big difference.

I'm a little disappointed that we didn't make them an attractive offer for the use of Apogee.

Yeah, let's call ol' Phil out from the shed so he can look at this heavy-duty construction rebar/concrete with his tape measure, give his blessing, then go back to repairing broken desks or something.

Isn't this what you pay a LOT of money for some other, more qualified, people to do? The district's only fault is that they misplaced trust & hired the wrong folks to build their palace.

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From the article Pogue has "ample insurance". I just don't see how this fix would only cost 1 million dollars. They are saying it would take 6 to 8 months to complete the repairs. That cost number sounds woefully underestimated given the scope of repairs and time to fix quoted. I think that number balloons exponentially when all the facts come out and analysis is completed.

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--- I am guessing it boils down to bad concrete.... So much of the concrete in North Dallas porches and many sidewalks looks strange to me... too gritty ... I am guessing they use way too much sand and not enough cement in the mix ...cheaper... . I'll guess that is also a factor in why so many home slabs have problems in the area... Never hear that anywhere else I have lived. ... plus bridge beams and highways build to State specs seem to hold up but not these things... . Lack of enough steel may be an issue as well.... May not be right but after looking at them and comparing seems reasonable,

--Could be with the blessing of the "cutting corners" contractor or just the concrete company with no quality inspections as it is being poured.... It will cost millions to fix.

Edited by SCREAMING EAGLE-66
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--- I am guessing it boils down to bad concrete.... So much of the concrete in North Dallas porches and many sidewalks looks strange to me... too gritty ... I am guessing they use way too much sand and not enough cement in the mix ...cheaper... . I'll guess that is also a factor in why so many home slabs have problems in the area... Never hear that anywhere else I have lived. ... plus bridge beams and highways build to State specs seem to hold up but not these things... . Lack of enough steel may be an issue as well.... May not be right but after looking at them and comparing seems reasonable,

--Could be with the blessing of the "cutting corners" contractor or just the concrete company with no quality inspections as it is being poured.... It will cost millions to fix.

The biggest enemy to concrete and asphalt, especially in north Dallas, is the clay underneath the topsoil. With the hot, dry summers it causes the soil (and clay) to shift resulting in cracking of roads, sidewalks, and even house foundations.

I love how you can look at how the concrete looks and you can instantly determine what the problem is.

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